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nakhrewali

I really enjoyed your write up and definitely going to check out Betaab now whenever I get my hands on it. You make such a convincing case!

Also really like Sunny's quote about it being a stress free shoot awww

katherine

U did not expect to fall in love with Betaab quite like I did -- so it's entirely possible that I'm *totally* overselling the film.

But it's gone up there with Hatya to being amongst my favorite films. And it's so beautiful to watch, even the crappy print I had was lovely, it must have been amazing to see it in a theatre.

katherine

Er. "I" did not expect. Fingers not working this morning.

Beth

Hmmm. You will not be surprised to hear that any sort of Taming of the Shrew-esque plot tends to get my hackles up, but as you point out with this one, if the heroine is immature and prejudiced, then of course she should learn some lessons and grow up. It's not change that I mind - I am FOR learning and growing and changing! - but rather the "taming" idea which is often (not always!) partnered with maturing, that in order to be an adult and/or worthy of being loved and/or able to see the hero for all his true and glorious goodness, the woman must be broken somehow.

I'm not saying that's what's happening here - just that that is a tendency I have seen. The fact that the "taming" is combined with the hero also having some flaws to overcome is reassuring. Contrast with, say, Jab Jab Phool Khile, in which the "needs to reform" heroine is a straw man in the eyes of the film and that the hero is as utterly and completely right as she is wrong.

Anyway. That you love this so much has me very intrigued!

Ness

there is a pattern beginning to form here.... ;-) if only we could figure out exactly what it is that makes you love a film and me hate it!

katherine

@Ness I think there's a lot of stuff I'm absolutely prepared to overlook to get to the stuff that's worth hanging on to. Just a different approach to what I watch.

But there's already a post up about what I overlooked in Betaab, and I'm planning a third one discussing *why* I was prepared to do that, and what I got out of it.

Of course, it's always a good chance that I have very questionable taste in films.

(That said -- we both love YPD. So, maybe I have moments of lucidity.)

Ness

I don't think your taste in films is questionable, just that, as you say, we watch them looking for different things and prepared to overlook in some cases different things for the sake of...whatever it is we value.

HAH I love that you mention our massive email marathons, if only we could (VASTLY EDIT) and publish them to let the world know how truly geeky we are

bollywoodeewana

Yor review on this is very interesting however i found it mehhh, a big part why i found it mehhh is that this boy meets girl with opposing family members became such a formula in bollywood that it was hard for me to enjoy it immensely, the only things i liked were the songs and Sunny and Amrita together otherwise I found the characters in this were very much archetypal

An interesting film that started this whole boy meets Girl/opposing family thing was 1973's Bobby the success of that movie made that
http://bollywood501.com/films/bobby/index.html
formula become the one way most bollywood stars or directors launch their sons or whoever they wanted to introduce to the cinema loving audience, another film in this category that preceded Betaab was Love Story (1981)

katherine

Oh, yes, Betaab (and Barsaat, and Socha Na Tha) has been raising all sorts of questions for me on the way Bollywood launches its sons, in particular, I find it very fascinating.

I think what I've been trying to point out in my continued discussion of the film (and that's been fuelled in the comments, too) is that for me, I can look beyond conventions and still find things satisfying to watch. I do think there are moments of real freshness in amongst it all. Admittedly, that's not a viewing experience that's going to appeal to everyone. And you know? that's fine, too.

@ness -- I have to mention the email marathons, because sometimes some of my bets material comes out of those. Credit where credit's due?

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